Disappearing documents, Archives Team, Facebook, and more: Link roundup 10/4/11

This time, on the link roundup, there are disappearing documents, distributed digital archives projects, inaccurate quilts, government records, and more! The Case of the Disappearing Documents [wsj.com] Archives Team: A Distributed Preservation of Service Attack [youtube.com] What Facebook’s Changes Mean for Museums and Visitor Serving Organizations [colleendilen.com] Metro ‘quilt’ art draws national scrutiny for historical inaccuracy [nashvillecitypaper.com] University’s digitization… Continue reading Disappearing documents, Archives Team, Facebook, and more: Link roundup 10/4/11

A journey through copyright for sound recordings

Recently I was looking for some music to use for a project a friend of mine is working on. I wanted to either use something public domain or something using a Creative Commons license, and not even try to navigate the waters of “fair use.” Librarians and archivists generally know the scope of US Copyright… Continue reading A journey through copyright for sound recordings

Archives and Open Content

(I originally wrote this a week ago, before this article was posted, but they dovetail well.) In the course of my work I did a brief survey of the copyright policies of some academic libraries and their archives, specifically focusing on websites and finding aids.  I found that most libraries and archives claim copyright over… Continue reading Archives and Open Content

Nook, Project Gutenberg, and Distributed Proofreading

I got a Barnes and Noble nook, which is an ebook reader, for Christmas.  So far, I’ve only loaded it up with free ebooks from Project Gutenberg.  Project Gutenberg is a project whose goal is to digitize out of copyright books and make them freely available online.  So far, I’ve downloaded Kafka Metamorphosis, Thoreau’s Walden,… Continue reading Nook, Project Gutenberg, and Distributed Proofreading